Training for the exam L1

ENGLISH TEST ART HISTORY L1          V.MORISSON

MAI 2005

 

Multiple Choice Questions (1 answer for each question)

 

1 The woman had almond-shaped blue eyes with long …

¦ eyelids                   ¦ eyebrow                 ¦ sockets                   ¦ eyelashes

2 The man, in his late sixties had a double chin and a …face.

¦ foggy                     ¦ fluffy                     ¦ wrinkled                ¦ jaw

3 A strand of ginger hair was gently falling on her large …

¦ nape                       ¦ bow tie                   ¦ apron                      ¦ forehead

4 The young chap was smiling earnestly and looked quite …

¦ stubborn                 ¦ boastful                  ¦ low-spirited           ¦ cheerful

5 William Hogarth was … a keen sense of humour.

¦ fraught with           ¦ involved in             ¦ disclosed by           ¦ endowed with

6 William Hogarth was born in …

¦ 1589                       ¦ 1608                       ¦ 1697                       ¦ 1852

7 William Hogarth was very famous for his …

¦ Italianate seascapes           ¦ official portraits                 ¦ satirical works       

8 William Hogarth made many …that could be bought at a very low price.

¦ frescoes                  ¦ sketches                 ¦ engravings             ¦ canvases

9 Hogarth was influenced by physognomics as well as by the…

¦ semi opera              ¦ theatre                    ¦ academy                ¦ De Piles

10 Most of William Hogarth’s works can be described as …

¦ charicaturings        ¦ comedies of manners                    ¦ laughing stocks

11 What Hogarth wanted to expose was the aristocracy’s…

¦ make-believe          ¦ hypocrisy               ¦ powerfulness         ¦ deception

12 Which of these genres was at the top of the academy’s hierarchy ?

¦ seascapes               ¦ historical painting  ¦ portraits                 ¦ nudes

13 William Hogarth’s art was new because he portrayed people …

¦ life-size                  ¦ full-length              ¦ as they were           ¦ with a fault

14 According to Hogarth, the line of beauty was … line.

¦ the serpentine        ¦ curvilinear              ¦ the straight             ¦ the geometrical

15 Hogarth contributing to making art more …

¦ popular                   ¦ spectacular             ¦ noble                      ¦ intellectual

16 Before Hogarth, portrait painters would mainly represent the …of the sitter.

¦ psychology            ¦ social status           ¦ features                  ¦ patron

17 Hogarth did not seek royal patronage nor did he recognize the primacy of…

¦ low art                   ¦ fine arts                  ¦ high art                  ¦ picturesque

18 In Gin Lane, People fight with …to get a drop of gin, regardless of their health.

¦ themselves             ¦ one anothers          ¦ the other’s              ¦ each other

19 The artist was so desperate after the failure of his show that he killed…

¦ hisself                    ¦ him                         ¦ himself                   ¦ itself

20 In Gin Lane, people pour … some alcohol, get drunk and fight …

¦ them / them            ¦ themselves / 0        ¦ themselves / each others    ¦ theirs / them

21In Gin Lane, there’s a brewery, a distillery and some dying people …

¦ nearby                    ¦ close to                  ¦ next to                   ¦ above

22 In Constable’s landscape there’s a rivulet and a stone bridge …the river.

¦ beyond                   ¦ at                            ¦ underneath             ¦ over

 

23 One of the characters in the foreground is leaning …a red brick wall, waiting for someone.

¦ between                 ¦ backwards             ¦ off                          ¦ against

24 Thomas Gainsborough was a well-known painter who founded the …

¦ St Martin’s school ¦ Pall Mall                ¦ Royal Academy     ¦ Turner Prize

25 Gainsborough was first and foremost a …painter like Reynolds.

¦ landscape               ¦ seascape                 ¦ portrait                   ¦ miniature

26 Gainsbourough was born in …

¦ 1516                       ¦ 1727                       ¦ 1842                       ¦ 1903

27 Gainsborough painted at a time when … was extremely popular in England.

¦ Claude’s work       ¦ Dutch painting       ¦ Illuminated books  ¦ sketches

28 Gainsborough was influenced by …

¦ Van Dyck              ¦ Poussin                  ¦ Hogarth                 ¦ Turner

29 Most of Gainsborough’s works can be described as …pieces in natural sceneries.

¦ conversation          ¦ countrylife             ¦ genre                      ¦ staged

30 In the end of his career Gainsbourough experimented with …

¦ acrylics                   ¦ artificial lighting    ¦ engraving               ¦ rococo patterns

31 Gainsborough was a countryman and therefore was highly interested in …

¦ the church steeple  ¦ the background      ¦ the stage                ¦ ruins

32 What Gainsborough wanted to depict was the …of the sitter.

¦ standing                 ¦ face                                    ¦ state of mind         ¦ pose

33 Gainsborough used a rich palette and a large range of …

¦ impastos                 ¦ glaze                      ¦ shades                    ¦ gradation

34 He often applies several …of thin paint to suggest the modelling.

¦ lawyers                  ¦ blenders                 ¦ layers                     ¦ lenders

35 To give a general impression of subtle elegance, he used some …colours.

¦ garish                     ¦ brightness              ¦ subdued                 ¦ jarring

36 The …contours of the figures were quite modern at the time.

¦ clear-cut                 ¦ enhance                  ¦ blurred                   ¦ sparkling

37 The painter added some white …on the dress to make it brighter and lighter.

¦ gazes                      ¦ sketches                 ¦ highlights               ¦ frames

38 The lady doesn’t look straight at us but …down thoughtfully.

¦ grins                       ¦ brimmed                ¦ gazes                      ¦ slows

39 The foliage of the tree is rendered with some brisk …to suggest movement.

¦ dabs                       ¦ brushstrokes           ¦ tints                                   ¦ chalks

40 The lady was dressed in a tight fitting blouse with …sleeves.

¦ hole                                    ¦ flounced                ¦ apron                      ¦ wig

41 This topographical drawing represents a humble …with peasants in the fields.

¦ mansion                 ¦ cottage                   ¦ thatched                 ¦ haystack

42 Constable lived in the Stour valley where he could enjoy natural …

¦ set                          ¦ sceneries                ¦ stages                     ¦ surroundings

43 The … of the river was crowded with people staring at the steamship.

¦ cliffs                      ¦ barren                     ¦ harvest                   ¦ shores

44 John Constable was  the son of a …

¦ royal painter           ¦ sailor                      ¦ mill owner              ¦ patron

45 Picturesque landscapes often feature small villages with their church …

¦ nestle                     ¦ hedges                   ¦ steeple                    ¦ beetle

46 Constable paid much attention to the ….that he painted very minutely.

¦ tree trunks              ¦ cattle                      ¦ mansions                ¦ atmospheric changes

47 Constable made some …, which was quite unusual at that time.

¦ topographical inks ¦ photographs           ¦ dabs                       ¦ oil sketches

48 Constable painted skies and storms very …thus heightening the sense of place.

¦ mastering               ¦ masterful                ¦ mastered                ¦ masterfully

49 The preciseness of …detail and density of substance related to the reality of the present.

¦ lighting                  ¦ colourful                ¦ thickness                ¦ foreground

50 Unlike most painters, who worked in their studios, Constable would sketch …

¦ at the RA               ¦ sun drenched         ¦ glowingly               ¦ outdoors

51 During the …books were delicately illuminated.

¦ Mid Ages               ¦ medieval time        ¦ Middle era             ¦ Middle Ages

52 Illuminated books were often made by …who lived in a monastery far away from the city.

¦ nuns                       ¦ nannies                   ¦ nurses                     ¦ monks

53 Books were ….treasured because they were lavishly decorated.

¦ understanding        ¦ misunderstood       ¦ understandable      ¦ understandably

54 Illuminated manuscripts were commissioned by wealthy …only.

¦ meceens                 ¦ royals                     ¦ merchants              ¦ patrons

55 ….their rich and costly decoration Books of Hours were considered as treasures.

¦ despite of               ¦ so much                 ¦ given that               ¦ on account of

56 The invention of printing …dramatic changes in book making.

¦ entailed                  ¦ enforced                ¦ conducted              ¦ boosting

57 Some Celtic illuminated manuscripts include intricate patterns and …lines.

¦ interwoven             ¦ curving                   ¦ smooth                   ¦ tiny

58 In Constable’s works much space is …to the sky.

¦ consecrated            ¦ devoted                 ¦ spent                      ¦ taken with

59 Turner is the exponent of the …in landscape painting.

¦ painterly                 ¦ sublime                  ¦ beauty                    ¦ caricature

60 Turner was said to be a very …man.

¦ busy                       ¦ solitary                   ¦ stubborn                 ¦ scornful

61 Duane Hanson would cast a …of his characters, hence the verisimilitude of his figures.

¦ eye                         ¦ row                        ¦ mould                    ¦ pediment

62 Most sculptors use chisels to …the block of stone.

¦ cut out                   ¦ chip                                    ¦ carve                      ¦ strike

63 Many contemporary sculptures have no …and are meant to be place outdoors.

¦ frieze                      ¦ pediment                ¦ pedestal                 ¦ shaft

64 Henry Moore was greatly influenced by a book by Roger Fry on …

¦ resin and fiberglass¦ the blitz                 ¦ Negro sculpture     ¦ Greek busts

65 Henry Moore made a series of …just after the war.

¦ tombs                     ¦ memorials              ¦ helmets                  ¦ assemblages

 

TRANSLATE THE FOLLOWING PASSAGE INTO FRENCH :

“Legend has it that during an Olympian competition to determine who could paint the most realistic picture, Zeuxis, one of the best-known draughtsman of ancient Greece, rendered a bunch of grapes with such an authenticity and precision that the birds flew to the painting to peck at it. With his remarkably lifelike, life-size sculptures of human beings, Duane Hanson created an equally convincing illusion.”

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